Negotiation and Project Management

Sunday, 27 March 2011 00:00

Leading Without Authority

Leadership is more than leading the people reporting to you. Too often, you need to lead people over which you lack any authority. The absence of hierarchical advantage adds a challenge, but is ideal training on how to deal with managers, customers, and difficult people. The key is making them feel the direction chosen is theirs. One of the best methods of doing this is storytelling.

Published in Project Rescue
Sunday, 18 October 2009 00:00

Four Easy Steps to Recovery

Recovery Flow The four steps to bring a project back from red. They are:

  1. Project Audit;
  2. Data Analysis;
  3. Solution Negotiation;
  4. Plan Execution.

Like any recovery, be it twelve-step or four-step, it goes nowhere without realization of the problem. Step zero is acknowledging the failure. Without this step, the problems and subsequent resolutions will not have full recognition and the project recovery will fail due to the lack of management support. With realization, the recovery process has meaning.

Published in Project Rescue
Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products to Mainstream Customers

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Author: Geoffrey A. Moore
Publisher: HarperBusiness
Released: August 2006
Type: Softcover
Pages: 227
ISBN:978-0201835953

To be a great project manager, you need to understand business. Your job is applying change to improve an organization, you had better understand why some changes and some leaders can create a metric differ to a company.

Published in Suggested Books
Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive

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Author:Noah J. Goldstein Ph.D., Steve J. Martin, Robert B. Cialdini Ph.D.
Publisher: Free Press
Released: December 2009
Type: Softcover
Pages: 272
ISBN:978-0201835953

Project managers spend 90% of their time trying to persuade people to do something be it stakeholders, executives, end users, or the project team. They spend very little time learning how to do it better. Yes! gives you fifty ways to change your message and help you persuade anyone to do anything (well, almost). You can also get our excel spreadsheet that helps you focus on the right tools for what ever you are trying to do.

New York Times bestselling introduction of fifty scientifically proven techniques for increasing your persuasive powers in business and life.

Small changes can make a big difference in your powers of persuasion.

Published in Suggested Books
Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

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Author:Roger Fisher, William L. Ury
Publisher: Penguin Books
Released: May 2011
Type: Softcover
Pages: 240
ISBN:978-0201835953

One of the primary tasks of a project manager is to negotiate—negotiate scope, negotiate for resources, negotiate for money, negotiate end dates, etc.—there is almost nothing that a project manager has as a give. Even in your personal life, negotiation skills are essential for dealing with everything from your kids' bedtime, to the price of your next car. Understanding the art and science of negotiation is critical. This book, especially in conjunction with one of our classes, is a great way to get you down the road to improving you negotiation skills. Don't be fooled though, negotiation takes practice.

Published in Suggested Books
Strategic Negotiation: A Breakthrough Four-Step Process for Effective Business Negotiation

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Author:Brian Dietmeyer
Publisher: Kaplan Business
Released: June 2004
Type: Hardcover
Pages: 224
ISBN:978-0201835953

Although this book it out of print, it has a wonderful and easy to use "checklist" to prep up for a negotiation. It is a great follow-on read to Getting to Yes! and talks heavily about the process of negotiation.

Corporate negotiation is a process like all other business strategies. In today's challenging and ever-changing business environment, it is imperative to understand negotiations from the perspective of both the buyer and the seller. In Strategic Negotiation, Dietmeyer and Kaplan use a research-based approach to negotiation that assists sales professionals in reaching their own business goals, while ensuring that their customers meet budget and professional objectives as well-going beyond win-win to achieve true, measurable business value for all parties at the negotiating table. The authors use their own strategic, four-step negotiation process to teach sales professionals how to attain quantifiable value in their dealings:

Published in Suggested Books

People fail to realize how many actions in personal and profession lives require negotiation. Whether managing contracts, running a project, or working on a raise, negotiation is a daily task. Implementing a process around negotiation and understanding the techniques for convincing your “buyer” of the need are critical in maximizing your chances for success. The planning that a process provides ensures collecting the correct information for preparing and proposing the new idea.

Published in College Classes
Sunday, 09 January 2011 00:00

Tomorrow's Project Manager

With the coming of 2011, it is time to reflect on our past and contemplate the future. We think about our families, our friends, our successes and failures; we think about our jobs, our professions, and the world of possibilities. We must reaffirm our ship's direction, stay the course, make corrections, or find a new destination. As project managers, we must look at the recent changes in the discipline and translate those into a plan for our professional development—a plan that meets our needs and the needs of the discipline.

Published in Strategy

Daily, we are involved in two acts—developing and following process and negotiating with stakeholders. We cannot escape them; they are part of the project management experience. Processes are required to maintain consistency, accuracy, and abide by regulations. Negotiation is required to create a valuable solution that meets the triple constraints.

To deal with the reality of business, you need a toolbox of techniques that can address the needs of the people who supply and consume information and the competing interests of stakeholders.

Published in College Classes

A Pretty Bar Graph

Businesses exist to make money. To improve operations they create various initiatives with promises of improving the bottom line. Projects, though, cost money. They do not make a profit. The dichotomy in a strapped economy to spend savings on projects to improve future profits usually results in the conservation of cash. Many an argument has been had over whether it is better to run improvement projects, burning precious cash and heading off the competition, or taking the traditional approach and wait for times with better cash flow. Subsequent to 2008's financial folly, it is well known that most companies sat on their reserves and waited. That action may have some unintended consequences that are in the midst of surfacing.

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