“We were successful with our ERP replacement initiative due, in part, to your presentations on running successful projects. In particular, the presentation Cover Oregon, What Would You Do? opened my eyes to create an atmosphere of accountability, need to continually define and adjust for achievable scope, and manage team to a “forced march” toward completion with a focus on “what can be done” and not trying to do everything. Thank you.”

Russell Boedeker, CFO

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“He did a fantastic job. In three and a half hours he not only familiarized our people with the psychology of change, but also walked them through how the proposed changes for next year will impact them and our clients.”

Christine Herb, VP Professional Services

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“My favorite speaker of all time! ... You made the audience feel engaged and important. People’s faces lit up when they could share their knowledge and experience.”

Raynette Yoshida
Institute of Management Accountants

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Internationally Recognized

The eCameron team is internationally recognized and routinely called upon by companies and organizations to help give as thought-leaders in executing initiatives successfully. We have completed workshops in North America, United Kingdom, and EMEA while booking more every daily.

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Presentations and workshops for your organization

The eCameron team can help your company your organization draw attendance, involvement, and money through interactive keynotes, educational classes, and fun workshops. Whether you are attracting executives, finance, information technology, or project managers, we have a topic that will excite them.

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Executive & Finance Related Presentations

Organization Change Management: What would you do?

"Our Changes just don't stick!" That is the cry of too many executives exasperated by the waste of resources trying to get people in their organization to adopt new processes. A major portion of the reason is the lack of an organization change management (OCM) mentality in the organization. This is no more apparent than in the method in which initiatives and their constituent projects are executed. Lack of end-user involvement and adoption accountability are at the core of this failure.

Executive Sponsorship: What would you do?

Few will disagree that sponsorship is critical to project success, yet how many times to you hear, “Our project sponsor is not engaged!” Our research shows that 80% of all PMs will tell you that engagement is the primary issue they face with the executive sponsor. Even more serious, when discussing the topic with executives, a very large majority will say that consistent, high-quality sponsorship is the number-one problem they see in executing initiatives successfully. 

The dearth of corporate leadership is stifling. Daily executives struggle with this reality. The challenge is creating the best learning environment for employees to debate situational leadership challenges. Too many times they are learning on-the-job and making costly mistakes leaving collateral damage in the workplace. Wouldn’t it be nice to have an environment where people could test their reactions to situations that have actually arisen and debate the appropriate resolution in a safe environment?

Nothing starts your day worse than waking up to a CNN News crew on your front porch. That is what happened with Cover Oregon (Oregon’s failed HIX implementation). Now, with multiple lawsuits filed, only time will tell who the real losers are. One thing is for sure—there will be no winners. With all the contracts, audit reports, and court documents in the public domain there is no better time to learn.

Leaders define vision. A business turns vision into value. It still takes a team of executives, managers, project managers, and individual contributors to drive the projects that build the capabilities transforming businesses. Ergo, projects are the enablers for turning vision into value.

Change is difficult. And, even if we can get people to change, will it stick? How about ropes, chains, whips, ropes, blindfolds, watermelons, and elastic bands in a fun G-rated presentation that get the audience on their feet and acting the roles that they may think is hindering them from change.

Project failure is rampant in nearly every industry. In the US alone, the cost are huge with estimates running as high as a trillion dollars a year. In most cases, the project manager and his or her team are blamed. The project, however, is only the symptom with the source of the failure imbedded in the organization. Project pressure stresses the weak links in the organization causing them to snap.

Social Media Icons

Marketing is difficult for any company. However, in small companies, where many people wear multiple hats, it is even worse. There is a vicious cycle between all-work/no-marketing and all-marketing/no-work. There are ways to address this problem but if takes planning and discipline.

Gold Bars

The ability to deliver initiatives that make breakthroughs in the business is the differentiator of a truly successful IT department. However, the project success rates are very poor. Failure rate estimates range from 40-75% of project are over budget, late, or fail to deliver the required functionality.

People often fail to realize how many actions in life are negotiation based. This is no different for in our work life. From managing projects to negotiating a raise, we do some form of negotiation daily. Implementing a process around negotiation is key in maximizing success. A process ensures collecting the correct information for preparing and proposing the new idea.