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Ensuring Project Capabilities Match Your Needs

Plans are nothing without the ability to implement them. People are paramount. Ninety-eight percent of the people in a company are focused on running the daily sales, marketing, manufacturing, finance, IT, product delivery, and so forth--in other words "their day job." They neither have the time and often do not have inclination to drive the implementation of a new plan. New plans require bringing in temporary staff and sometimes new full-time skills to ensure the new goals are met in a timely manner.

Second to people, the right level of process is needed; however, too many organizations rely on process as the Holy Grail. Process needs to provide structure without bureaucracy. It must be agile enough to enable a team to quickly deliver critical capabilities yet adaptable to the inevitable adjustments as the business climates change.

Finally, and only after people and process, the focus turns to technology. It is only a tool to make the right people and processes more effective and efficient.
At eCameron, we live by the credo - people, process, and then technology all aligned to your strategy.

Process is at the core of any business. It makes work predictable, repeatable, and transferable. Without it we cannot scale our businesses. However, process can be a bane to making progress. Processes that work for a $10 million company have difficulties supporting a $30 million company. Trying to scale them to a $300 million company will not only fail but not address the issues that larger companies have that were never dreamt of in a smaller organization. Processes need to be discarded, revamped, and built—all of that without creating an overburdening bureaucracy.

Anytime you need to go someplace, you first have to know where you are. Processes are never static and your company's current state is probably far from where you think it is. Hence, the first step is mapping out you company's current state followed by defining the future state. This is more than a logical map of the process; it must also include physical maps. Whether your process is solely to provide a service (say, website development) or physical (say, manufacturing) there are logistical issues that complicate the process flow. Without fully understanding those nuances, future state processes will not reach the desired efficiencies.

For more information about process mapping fill out the form to the left and we will get in touch with you.

Capabilities Blog Posts

  • Comparing Organizational Change Management Models Written on Monday, 23 November 2015 11:55
    A few weeks ago, I set out to write a post on the comparison of various organizational change management (OCM) methodologies and realized that would be a disservice to my…
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  • The Catch-22 of Organizational Change Management Written on Wednesday, 30 September 2015 15:47
    "Kotter, ADKAR, or CAP which methodology should we be using to build our approach to improving project adoption?" I hear this question repeatedly from people trying to implement an organizational…
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  • Ethics, Liars, and Naïveté Written on Sunday, 10 June 2012 00:00
    Are there any ethics in business today? Time and again, headlines proclaim where companies and leaders have gone astray. You cannot help but wonder what our fellow humans will do…
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  • The Failure in Open-Mindedness Written on Sunday, 29 April 2012 00:00
    The west coast of the United States is where I call home. Many refer to us as "left coaster" because... well... that is how it looks on a map and…
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  • The Art Of No Written on Sunday, 22 April 2012 00:00
    There I was, in a posh Montreal hotel conference room, two customers on one side of the table, and my client and me on the other. Taped to the back…
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  • B Is For Blame, F Is For... Written on Sunday, 05 June 2011 00:00
    I have written about, spoke on, and lobbied against blame. Regardless, it just seems like a bottomless pit of contention, conversation, and criticism. People fail to see how to correct…
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  • Executive's Role in Project Success Written on Sunday, 08 May 2011 00:00
    Few would question that executives are responsible for ensuring projects are aligned with the corporate strategy. They also need to ensure these initiatives remain in line with these goals as…
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  • Project Failures are Organization Failures Written on Sunday, 20 March 2011 00:00
    Vision, honesty, and transparency: three key traits of an organization that can guarantee project success. This was summed up in last week's interview with Tom Cox, the host of Blog…
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  • Fault, Trust, and Confession Written on Sunday, 20 February 2011 00:00
    A couple weeks ago, I was in eating my pre-keynote dinner with a group of people that I had never met. Without being prompted by some general drift in the…
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  • The Dearth of Competent Middle Management Written on Sunday, 31 October 2010 00:00
    It happens hundreds of times a day around the world, the CIO calls an urgent IT Management Committee meeting. She has heard that one of the projects in the portfolio,…
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  • Loyalty: The Ever Changing Company-Employee Relationship Written on Sunday, 26 September 2010 00:00
    Loyalty. I have heard a lot about loyalty lately. It focuses on a company's loyalty to their employees. The current stormy economic condition means layoffs and employees on both sides…
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  • Management On A Mobius Strip Written on Sunday, 18 July 2010 00:00
    The two most common project attributes that raise the red flag are cost and timeline problems. Both are easily measured and inextricable intertwined. As the timeline extends, there is a…
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