December 2015 - Vision to Value eJournal

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Happy Holidays! Whether you are into Christmas, Hanukkah (yeah, I am about a week late), Winter Solstice, or nothing at all, I hope you are enjoying December. Since my family celebrates Christmas and we have little kids it is a very fun time of year. I simply hope is that your December is peaceful and relaxing.

Taste of RLF January 21, 2016

Calling all Leaders! Do you live or work in the Portland/Vancouver Metro area? How about a taste of RLF? Mark your calendar for the morning of January 21 and join us for a taste of breakfast and RLF!

Speaking of Regional Leadership Forum (RLF)... registration is still open, but time is running out for the $500 early bird discount and the runway is even shorter to get it charged against the 2015 year budget! This is a great 9-month program put on my SIM (Society for Information Management) in nine regions around the United States. If you are in the Pacific Northwest and a member of PMI, we are also working on a chapter sponsored discount of an additional $500. Between these two discounts you could save as much as 14% on the total cost! Please drop me a note, give me a call, 360-834-7361, or visit its web page.

This month's Vision to Value eJournal covers:

  • Continued conversation on Organization Change Management (OCM).
  • The challenges of communications with leadership and challenges with PMOs.
  • Part II of a case study on what kills you if your project ends up in court.

I hope you enjoy them!

Cheers,
  Todd C. Williams
  President, eCameron


A few weeks ago, I set out to write a post on the comparison of various organizational change management (OCM) methodologies and realized that would be a disservice to my readers. It would simply drag you down the path of implementation while failing to focus you on building the foundation. The pressure was too much and I have relented to numerous requests on making that comparison. The caveat is that juxtaposing these models is not comparing different varieties of oranges or even apples and oranges; we are surely comparing the peel to the fruit they contain. Hence, comparing methodologies like Kotter's model (the peel), Prosci's ADKAR (the core), and General Electric's Change Acceleration Process (the whole fruit) need a different approach.

Tales of an Expert Witness: Sex, Lies, and Video Tape (Part II)

Trust relationships, certifications, and standards sound like such a safe harbor. These sound like such great words in a proposal or statement of work. How could you possibly go wrong building a trusted relationship with a customer by committing to follow a standard? In fact, this can burn you… in court.

No one ever starts a project with the goal of ending up in court. In fact, litigation may never cross your mind; after all, you have built a trusted partner relationship. Taking a few cautionary steps, however, will make your life easier if you end up in that ill-fated litigious position. Your best chances for success come long before you enter the courtroom—even before the project starts.

It was such an innocuous question, "Working on an article; what is the biggest problem you see with project governance at orgs? Can you comment?" Can I comment? Really? That is like cheese to a mouse. Where could I start—bureaucracy, draconian process, poor executive sponsorship, disengaged leaders? Plenty of fodder, because they all lead to project failure. I fired off, "Creating an over bureaucratic morass stifling innovation & implementing process instead of cultivating leaders." Then the maelstrom started and it went directly to the gap between the executives and projects managers. Naomi Caietti, Robert Kelly and I had a great conversation. Most of the thread is below.

After nearly 30 years of project work, I struggle to understand the role of a project management office (PMO). Even though, I have written of the pros and cons, and read a plethora of articles, opinions, and how-to guides little has been done to convince me that the PMO is reducing project failure. It seems to be nothing more than a tool to fill a void in leadership? Even the acronym, which is so widely thrown around, has little meaning as the "P" has no less than four meanings. It is an executive's crutch for their lack of understanding in how projects work. These, like other, unattended holes in the corporate accountability create opportunities for new and greater bureaucracies and empires that further obfuscate accountability.

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Please give me a call to join our Taste of RLF (and a little bit of food) in Portland
January 21, 2016!
(360) 834-7361

The Price of Poor Leadership:

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The #1 reason IT does not have a seat at "The Table"

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